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In the Days of Rain: A Daughter, a Father, a Cult

In the Days of Rain: A Daughter, a Father, a Cult

by

A father-daughter story that tells of the the author's experience growing up in the Exclusive Brethren, a fundamentalist, separatist Christian cult, from the author of the national bestseller Ghostwalk.

Rebecca Stott was born a fourth-generation Brethren and she grew up in England, in the Brighton branch of the Exclusive Brethren cult in the early 1960s. Her family dated back to the group's origins in the first half of the nineteenth century, and her father was a high-ranking minister. However, as an intelligent, inquiring child, Stott was always asking dangerous questions and so, it turns out, was her father, who was also full of doubt. When a sex scandal tore the Exclusive Brethren apart in 1970, her father pulled the family out of the cult. But its impact on their lives shaped everything before and all that was to come.

The Iron Room (named for the windowless meeting houses made of corrugated iron where the Brethren would worship) is Stott's attempt to understand and even forgive her father: a brilliant, charismatic, difficult, and at times cruel man who nonetheless inspired his daughter with his love of literature, film, and art and with his passion for life.

Title:In the Days of Rain: A Daughter, a Father, a Cult
ISBN:0812989082
Format Type:
Number of Pages:320 pages
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    In the Days of Rain: A Daughter, a Father, a Cult Reviews

  • Petra Eggs

    DNF. This should have been a fabulously interesting book, but was a deadly dull history of the Exclusive Brethren. The rest is about her father, his dying, how he'd been in prison, her forebears were ...

  • Conrad

    My first year of college was an experience of many new things. One of the more rewarding things I learned that year was that Ingmar Bergman was a great filmmaker. I had seen his name in several books ...

  • Barbara (The Bibliophage)

    Full review at TheBibliophage.comAs her father is dying, Rebecca Stott agrees to finish his memoirs. In doing so, she tells the story of four generations including her own. Starting with her great-gra...

  • Sue Kichenside

    Rapture, rupture and re-entry to the world.Rebecca Stott’s memoir about her family’s involvement with the Exclusive Brethren is divided into three parts: her formative years in the sect, her fathe...

  • Carla

    I've always been fascinated by religious cults, particularly since I now believe I had once been introduced to one. This book is written by an adult daughter when she comes back home to look after her...

  • Sasha

    An interesting read about Rebecca Stott, her father, and building a life after leaving the Exclusive Brethren. As Stott's father is dying he asks for her help to complete his memoir but he has been st...

  • Paul

    This is a well-written story of growing up in a dysfunctional family--in this case, the Exclusive Brethren, which have congregations all over the world despite being very small. The book reminded me a...

  • Laurie

    Rebecca Stott was born into a cult. So was her father. He was a high ranking official in the church called the Exclusive Brethren. An End of Times cult, they felt they had to purify themselves so they...

  • Aksel Dadswell

    A beautifully written, heart-breaking, infuriating account of the author's childhood growing up in the Brethren, this was so memorable for Stott's portrayal of both the ways in which the strict, highl...

  • Pgchuis

    I received a copy of this memoir from the publisher via NetGalley. I requested it after reading a review in the Guardian and am glad I did so. The author tells the story of her childhood growing up in...